Feeds

UK.biz ready for disaster, says UK.biz

We the prepared

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

UK enterprises are ready for a major disaster.

That's the conclusion of a survey by server hosting outfit TDM Group which found 79 per cent of businesses believe they would have their IT Systems "up and running within minutes in the event of a disaster".

In a telephone poll of 100 enterprise IT managers, commissioned by TDM, the vast majority reported they had disaster recovery provisions in place that would allow them to restore systems with minimal delay in the event of a disaster. Only 21 per cent of companies surveyed don't have disaster recovery plans in place, according to the survey.

TDM extrapolates these stats to suggest that as many as 360,000 UK firms have made inadequate contingency plans for their IT systems. The true figure could be even higher.

A spokesman for TDM conceded that IT managers might not be altogether candid when confronted with questions about whether they would cope when something goes wrong. So maybe the 21 per cent of companies who say they don't have disaster recovery plans, or believe recovery from a major problem may take some time, are simply been more honest.

So what actually happens when disasters strike? A few examples help to clarify the point.

An arson attack in Manchester last October damaged the city's telecom infrastructure, affected the operations of Co-op Bank and left many firms in the area without phones. Denial of service attacks all too frequently affect the services of an attacked ISP (for example the attack against Tiscali this week). Meanwhile Cropped cables made Dabs.com unavailable last October.

The list goes on.

Disaster recovery is not just about dealing with the aftermath of terrorist outages but a far wider range of risks created by acts of God, human error or ciminal behaviour.

Previous experience suggests, in our opinion, that far fewer than four in five companies would be "up and running within minutes in the event of a disaster".

So the basic message is that businesses need to have some kind of disaster recovery plan in place, appropriate to their business needs, that is regularly tested and reviewed. That way they might cope better when trouble strikes.

Hopefully. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.