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Micron touts first 4GB DDR DIMM

More memory for all

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Memory maker Micron yesterday sent what it claims is the industry's first 4GB DDR SDRAM registered DIMM to Intel - presumably for verification and (it hopes) endorsement.

The DIMM is based on Micron's 1Gb 2.5V 266MHz DDR chip. It is a standard 184-pin PC1600 and PC2100 memory module. The DIMMs enable system vendors to offer machines with up to 64GB of memory.

The 1Gb part is fabbed using Micron's 0.11 micron process.

"The use of this advanced process technology delivers a smaller die size, which has enabled us to develop high density DIMM modules," said Terry Lee, Executive Director of Advanced Technology and Strategic Marketing for Micron's Computing and Consumer Group, in a statement. "We are also applying 0.11mm process technology to other high-volume products, continuing our long-standing tradition of cost reduction and efficiency."

Earlier this year, Micron demonstrated a 1GB DIMM based on its 1Gb part.

Around the same time, Samsung announced a 4GB DIMM based on its own 0.1 micron 1Gb DDR chips. Samsung said it plans to mass produce the chip in the second half of the year. ®

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