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New Symbian phones from Mitsubishi, BenQ, Samsung

Swivel is the new black

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The next wave of Symbian OS phones is well under way this week, with groovy new designs from Mitsubishi, BenQ and Samsung. Cameras, big screens, swivelling bits - yup, looks like we're about to witness an entertaining envelope-pushing contest.

The Mitsubishi, on show at CeBIT, is a concept really, but a jolly interesting looking one. It's billed as a "next generation mobile terminal," which means it's a combo wireless LAN unit, mobile phone and VoIP Internet phone. It changes function when you swivel it, and it's currently leading in the swivel wars, as far as we can see, because it's got two bits that swivel.

No obvious swiveling from the BenQ P30, but this one is very nearly real, and as a UIQ product it will be a Sony-Ericsson P800 rival. It's due out in Taiwan in the second half.

Samsung's SGH-D700 is a remarkably swift and highly-specced (aside from an apparent lack of Bluetooth) execution of the Series 60 UI, apparently. It swivels too, and is also due in the second half. You can find a full spec, plus several pictures, at All About Symbian. ®

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