Feeds

Sun's stealth mode P2P gets modular

Software needs wetware

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

Sun released its Jxta Peer-to-Peer technology two years ago, just at the moment, that the P2P hype was imploding in on itself.

But it's survived in stealth mode, and today Sun claimed it had reached a milestone of a million downloads for Jxta, which is available under an open source BSD-style license. But more interestingly, a new version 2.0 touts a new modular architecture.

Juan Carlos Soto, the group manager for business and engineering for Jxta, told us that version 2.0 introduced a much more modular architecture, so it could live more comfortably alongside sympathetic technologies.

One example is JXTA's SRDI, or Shared Resource Distributed Index.

"It's very much like a distributed hash table," Soto told us. "One of the complications with distributed hash tables is that they require a fairly stable network. With SRDI there's a DHCP-type mechanism that does not require as much network stability."

People can plug in a formal DHT if they want, he said.

Another example is that the algorithm used to walk the superpeer network is itself pluggable, as is discovery, which is now more robust. (Superpeers are new in version 2.0. Gnutella introduced a superpeer model quite early on its evolution.)

Jxta has a few unique aspects. It's perhaps the only project that has major backing from a vendor that's released under an acceptable (to many people) open source license. Sun is keen to see it used in low-cost embedded or mobile devices, and customer examples cited such examples. Although one company, Internet Access Methods, has used Jxta to create a distributed IDE for software developers.

Jxta reference code is Java, but a C version is being nursed along too. (P2P developer Brandon Wiley, whose Alluvium project you must read about is a huge Java fan, says people can implement Alluvium "as a patch"). As is a MIDP version.

So maybe stealth mode isn't such a bad thing. ®

Related Stories

No Joy from P2P vets for Sun's Jxta
After Java and Jini, Bill Joy unveils the Third J
Browers on wheels
Swarm Radio - a cheaper, faster 'casting tech

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests
Big Blue finds containers are speedy, but may not have much room to improve
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Gartner's Special Report: Should you believe the hype?
Enough hot air to carry a balloon to the Moon
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.