Feeds

HP talks networks

Close to the Edge

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

HP is looking to grow its share in the networking market by reducing the complexity associated with network rollouts.

Last month HP introduced its ProCurve Network Adaptive Edge Architecture as a framework designed to deliver control at the edge of a network. The architecture is designed to make it simpler for users to manage complex applications, such as mobility, security and voice/data convergence.

Historically, the brains of networks have been located at the network core. But deferring security and traffic management to the core increases cost and complexity, HP argues. The approach also leaves networks exposed to security risks between the points where access is made and where authorisation is granted.

A better, and more scalable approach is to build intelligence into access devices, leaving core networks to manage aggregation and traffic routing.

At a pan-European conference in Barcelona this week, HP execs outlined their approach to the networking market.

HP, a strong number three in the switching market behind Cisco and 3Com, is targeting enterprise users for further growth. Its strategy is solid, if somewhat unexciting, just like its products.

John McHugh, VP and general manager of HP's ProCurve Networking Business, told journalists HP was trying to remove the black-arts reputation still sometimes associated with networking.

In moving from the "esoteric to the mainstream" HP is taking a similar approach to networking it previously applied to printing.

That means making networking more reliable and secure. It doesn't mean, however, that HP wants to see networking commoditised.

Perish the thought.

McHugh told us that technological advancements will prevent commoditisation of the market for the near future, despite the entry of Dell into the networking market.

Here HP is talking about innovations such as iSCSI, which might allow storage to be run over Gigabit Ethernet rather than more complex Fibre-Channel networks, roaming between wireless LAN and telco networks (still three-five years away, according to McHugh) and Gigabit Ethernet to the desktop.

But few applications need Gigabit Ethernet to the desktop and HP's enthusiasm for iSCSI is cautious.

"The softness in the storage market has dampened enthusiasm in iSCSI," McHugh told us.

Softly, softly catchee BOFH

That answer is symptomatic of HP's conservative approach to the networking market, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

HP doesn't plan to introduce 802.11g wireless networking kit until the high-speed 2.4GHz wireless networking standard is ratified this summer, thus sparing customers the potential grief non-compliant kit may bring. HP isn't firmly committed to either 802.11g or 5Ghz 802.11a kit for the future of wireless LAN deployments, McHugh told us.

On wireless LAN security, HP is a firm backer of 802.1X port-based access controls. The 802.1X standard provides for dynamic changes in WEP keys.

Many vendors back VPNs as a means to keep secure wireless data. Techies running a demo on wireless networking security argued that VPNs introduce a performance overhead. Using 802.1X will guard similarly against the perils of war driving while making it easier for users to use the same log-in system (based on Radius servers) when connecting via fixed or wireless networks, they argued.

HP is extending its architecture, which is similar in many respects to Cisco's AVVID framework, via firmware upgrades to its networking kit.

For example, earlier this month provided a software upgrade to its ProCurve Switch 5300xl series to introduce support for access control lists (ACLs). This allows access control between different VPNs via Layer 3 and 4 filtering. Previously HP introduced Layer 3 (routing) firmware upgrades to its Layer 2 switches, such as the ProCurve 4100, 2650 and 6108 series.

These are useful, though hardly exciting, innovations. Much like HP's networking strategy in general then. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.