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Intel wheels out two concept PCs

Newport and Marble Falls

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IDF Intel wheeled out two new concept PC platforms - and two new codenames at the Intel Developer's Forum (IDF) today.

Say hello to Newport, the next gen mobile PC for the knowledge worker, and to Marble Falls, the next gen etc, only this time for desktops. PCs incorporating their technology should start hitting the streets in 2004. We expect more from Intel on the subject tomorrow. Today, they got their first outing, courtesy of Intel CEO Craig Barrett's opening keynote.

Newport is based on Centrino and introduces the concept of what Intel dubs "closed lid computing". In other words, there's a little LCD featuring a greatly simplified UI incorporated onto the outside of the notebook casing. This enables the user to, say, answer his or her emails, even when the notebook is closed. Is there no escape from always on-working?

Newport notebooks will also have wireless-searching and switching capabilities. Apparently they will seek for and switch to the best available network, whether it's .11 or GPRS.

Oh, the Newport demo machine featured a detachable tablet.

And on to Marble Falls. This has an onboard chipset for dual independent audio and video -i.e. two monitors will run on one PC. And integrated camera is supplied. ®

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