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Opera unleashes Linux preview of version 7 browser

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On Friday Opera announced the first Linux preview edition of Opera 7, the company's next-generation browser, which recently shipped for Windows. The company stresses that the Linux version's a preview, so there are rough edges, but it means that we're moving, and Linux users can more or less keep pace with what Opera's up to on the Windows platform.

Which is particularly good news for The Register. We were recently browbeaten by Opera marcom into installing 7 for Windows, and after a week or so's use we think it's quite nice. Tempting us back to Windows, Opera? Shame on you.

In the Linux preview's rough edges of department, Opera says that most Linux-specific features of Opera 6.1 are gone "for now," DnD isn't fully working, there are some focus-related problems, and font setup might be a bit picky. It does however come with the new email and news client, which we think we like.

You can download it here.
 
Opera, you may have noticed, is up to its old 'formation announcements' trick. We've had 7 for Windows, now 7 for Linux, Opera for mobile phones and a Swedish chef gag we haven't even got around to mentioning yet.

Well, the latter is not getting a separate story, and that's that. But it's a pretty good gag. Opera recently lashed out over what it said was a deliberate attempt by MSN to make Opera look broken. It has subsequently followed this up with a special commemorative edition of Opera 7 which is fully-functional apart from translating msn.com into Swedish chef language. Slippery slopes, we reckon - The Register will be demanding the Linux version next, and users may revolt if Opera doesn't keep the Bork versions in sync with the vanilla ones. Code borking, we think you call this. But you can more info about it here, and download it from here.

Actually there seems to be some other stuff in the custom folder too; CNET version - is that satirical too? ®

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