Feeds

Data Protection Register is Out of Date

Microsoft is Innocent!

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

Oh phooey! Microsoft's data protection registration has not, as it so baldly states on the Data Protection Register web site, expired after all.

No, the Data Protection Register is wot to blame. The guardian of our personal data has a big backlog in processing registrations and - it looks like - an even bigger backlog in updating the list on the DPR Web site.

On Monday, we noted that an online check shows that Microsoft Ltd's entry in the Data Protection Register expired on January 8. Not so. Microsoft sent in its registration update on 23 December and it is registered until January 8, 2004, the company tells us.

A spokesperson in the Information Commissioner's office (which administers the Data Protection Act 1998) confirmed that Microsoft had made the Jan 8 deadline. Companies can continue to lawfully hold and process personal data, so long as the DPR receives valid applications by their due date, the organisation says.

Which is a relief, not just for Microsoft but for the many other organisations including Novell UK, Ford Motor Company, Gameplay, Manchester United Football Club Ltd and (most surprisingly) the Cabinet Office whose entries have expired since mid-December, according to publicly available records.

The Information Commissioner's office was unable to tell us how many applications are still to be processed but suggested the backlog runs to a "couple of weeks".

The public register is updated weekly, and it may be several weeks before new notifications, renewals and amendments appear online.

A spokesperson for the Information Commissioner's office said the current backlog in processing applications is greater than usual, noting that the organisation has been "inundated" with complaints about third party registration services.

Companies are advised to submit applications to the Information Commissioner (and pay £35) rather than trust third parties (typically charging £95) with no connection to the Commissioner. Its strongly worded warning on the subject can be found here.

So, companies have nothing to fear, if their application is submitted on time to the Commissioner -even if their entry has not yet been updated. It's important to remember that failure to submit an application is a serious matter.

The Data Protection Act 1998 requires every data controller (excluding limited exceptions) who is processing personal data to submit a registration. Failure to do so means a company is, under UK law, illegally holding personal data and might become subject to criminal prosecution. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.