Feeds

Infineon turns screws on ProMOS

License? What License!

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Infineon is terminating its technology license agreement with ProMOS, the Taiwanese semiconductor foundry, following court approval in Taiwan.

At the same time, the Hsinchu District Court has ordered the immediate re-instatement of two Infineon employees who were, says Infineon, "illegally removed at the Extraordinary Shareholder Meeting of ProMOS on January 10".

Infineon is a major shareholder in ProMOS and is locked in a bitter dispute with Taiwanese firm Mosel-Vitelic, the other major shareholder, and former JV partner. ProMOS makes, or rather, made DRAM chips using Infineon technology. Infineon then supplied Mosel Vitelic with DRAM chips.

Infineon walked away from the deal, in place since 1996, last year, citing "repeated breach of contract" by Mosel Vitelic. At the time, it said it hoped to renegotiate a supply relationship with ProMOS. Now it is playing hard ball. In a statement today, the German firm says: "There is no more a basis to continue this cooperation because of repeated violations of the shareholders agreement by Mosel Vitelic, the breach of the license agreement by ProMOS and further measures by Mosel Vitelic, which controls the ProMOS board, impairing the partnership." ®

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.