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Welsh virus writer Vallor jailed for two years

Not a nerd, a criminal, says judge

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A 22-old Welsh Web designer who pleaded guilty to creating and distributing three mass mailer viruses was sentenced to two years imprisonment at Southwark Crown Court this afternoon.

Simon Vallor, of Llandudno, North Wales, last month admitted offences under section three of the Computer Misuse Act 1990 in creating the Gokar, Redesi and Admirer mass mailing viruses.

In sentencing Judge Geoffrey Rivlin said: "Virus writers are not so-called computer buffs or nerds, they happen to be criminals... Their viruses cause destruction, disruption, consternation and even economic loss on a grand scale." In sentencing, however, he took into account Vallor's youth, his plea of guilty, and previous good character.

At a hearing on December 20 in Bow Street Magistrates Court, prosecutors submitted evidence that these viruses spread to 27,000 computers in 42 countries. In early 2002, Gokar was the third most common virus on the Net. Today, the prosecution claimed 330,000 intercepts in 46 different countries.

Vallor pleaded guilty to the three Computer Misuse Act offences against him at the December 20 hearing, where charges against him relating to the possession of indecent images of children were withdrawn when the police presented no evidence.

Vallor was arrested on February 14 last year and charged with offences under section three of the Computer Misuse Act 1990, by British police acting on intelligence from the FBI's Baltimore field office.

Officers from Scotland Yard's specialist Computer Crime Unit assisted North Wales police in their investigation. ®

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Welsh Web designer pleads guilty to virus creation
Welsh Web designer charged with virus writing, child porn offences
Linux rootkit hacker suspect arrested in UK

External Links

Vallor's Web site devilwithin.com (which reveals something of his interest in the Wiccan religion and VX writing)

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