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ComputerWire logo Groupe Bull SA has announced the launch of a new Linux server and software stack called LinuxExpress, which includes hardware, services and open source software for web, groupware, application servers, and high availability.

The Paris, France-based company's Linux hardware and software stack is based on the Express5800 Intel Corp-based server line that Bull OEMs from NEC Corp and was developed by NEC in conjunction with fault-tolerant server specialist Stratus Technologies Inc.

On top of the Express5800 hardware, LinuxExpress also features a Linux distribution from either Red Hat Inc, SuSE Linux AG or MandrakeSoft SA, and open source software for web, workgroup, application server and high-availability uses. Four versions of LinuxExpress are available: Web for Linux, Workgroup for Linux, JOnAS for Linux, and High Availability for Linux.

Web for Linux includes the Apache Web and reverse proxy server software, integrated e-commerce tools, DNS, NAT, load balancing, firewall and administration software, while Workgroup for Linux includes OpenLDAP directory messaging, workflow tools, file and print sharing, firewall and administration software.

JOnAS for Linux is designed for Java2 Enterprise Edition application serving and is based on ObjectWeb application server tools, while High Availability for Linux is designed to enable the clustering of Web for Linux and Workgroup for Linux application servers with support for the Kimberlite HA high-availability software, Fibre Channel, and DAS 5300 disk subsystem.

The hardware and software is backed up by a support service that offers hotline support for architecture design and optimization and can be extended to cover remote monitoring, remote management and remote exploitation as well as open source security, network and development environments.

Pricing depends on server configuration and software, although an entry-level Web for Linux package costs from 2,468 euros ($2,594) and comes with a 1.8GHz Intel Xeon DP-based LinuxExpress 120Rc-1 server, Red Hat 7.3 Professional Edition, the Web for Linux open source software stack and two months of support.

© ComputerWire

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