Feeds

IBM to resell Nokia mobile VPN

Good news for Symbian

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

IBM Corp and Nokia Corp took a major step towards guaranteeing a healthy enterprise future for Symbian-based mobile devices yesterday, with the announcement of a systems integration tie-up between the two companies for Nokia's Mobile VPN (virtual private network) offering.

Under the deal, IBM's Global Services unit, which is the world's biggest IT services company with annual revenue of approximately $35bn, will sell Nokia's Mobile VPN, and by extension the Symbian OS-based devices it supports, into its global client base of Fortune 5000 companies.

Neither IBM nor Nokia would comment on the likely take-up of the product, which comprises the server-side Nokia Security Service Manager (NSSM) and the Nokia Mobile VPN Client, other than to say that "customers are planning large roll-outs."

However, the potential ramifications for the wireless enterprise are great, not only in terms of encouraging wireless access to back-end data, but also in paving the way for Symbian-based devices to become access points of choice for global companies seeking secure wireless access to back-end systems.

"When we work with customers we're seeing a demand for more and more mobile devices," said Lars Alm, general manager wireless ebusiness services for IBM EMEA. "It's good that companies have a choice [of mobile devices], but clearly smart phones will play a more significant role in future."

"We definitely see this agreement as very significant. Symbian devices will be used more and more by business users," said Mauri Niininen, services director mobile internet security with Espoo, Finland-based Nokia.

For many companies, the partnership will represent a robust means of embarking on an enterprise-wide wireless initiative, delivering secure and easily manageable wireless access to back-end data through NSSM, a tool for over-the-air provisioning, updating and management of security applications on Symbian OS-based devices launched in early November.

Users are not committed to Nokia's own VPN products, with compatibility guaranteed with IPSec-based products, such as those from Cisco Systems or Check Point Software Technologies.

However, Nokia's Niininen warned that a wireless VPN is simply the first step in implementing a wireless strategy. "From the IT point of view, it should not be that complicated to implement. The real bottleneck is developing the applications [that make use of it]." IBM's and Nokia's experience with mobile applications should help here.

Nokia first made its wireless VPN intentions clear in March when it began to bundle its VPN client software with its 9210i Communicator. ComputerWire speculated at the time that Nokia's involvement could put pressure on wireless VPN specialists such as Certicom Corp and Columbitech AB, at least where support for Symbian-based devices is a requirement.

© ComputerWire

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.