Feeds

Study debunks e-mail overload myth

Time saver

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Contrary to the perception that workers are flooded with e-mail, most workers are happy with their e-mail levels and believe that it helps them in their work.
A new US-based survey carried out by the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that e-mail is now used by more than 57 million workers, almost double the number that used it two years ago.

The survey found that the average American who uses e-mail at work spends about a half hour handling e-mail and that the majority of work e-mailers receive ten or fewer e-mails a day and send five or fewer.

"We began this survey expecting to find the beginning of a backlash against e-mail not just against spam, but also against the rising volume of all kinds of e-mail," said Deborah Fallows, a senior research fellow at the Pew Internet & American Life Project and author of a report on the survey. "Instead, we found that most American workers are pleased with the role e-mail plays in their job, and we found almost zero evidence of disillusionment with e-mail. "

Asked to rate e-mail's place in their work on a scale of one to ten, 52 per cent ranked it as essential and another 34 per cent viewed it as valuable. Relatively few rated it a waste of time.

Seventy-two per cent of workers said that e-mail helps them to communicate with more people and 72 per cent of the respondents say that e-mail saves them time. Six of out ten workers say that e-mail improves workplace teamwork and 43 per cent say that e-mail has offered them some relief at times during their workdays.

The survey did find some negative aspects to workplace e-mail. About a quarter of e-mailers find e-mail distracting, 20 per cent say that e-mail has caused misunderstandings at work and a similar number say that e-mail has added a new source of stress at work.

© ENN

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.