Feeds

Liberty insists no rift, just differences of opinion

Distinct lack of fraternité

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

Reports of a damaging rift between Liberty Alliance Project members have been down played, although differences do exist in the platforms vendors are likely to target.

Liberty president Michael Barrett said yesterday individual group members are interested in only certain platforms and technologies. Barrett insisted, though, this does not represent a split.

At a "functional level", he said, members are still working together, developing specifications. Liberty 2.0 is due in the first half of 2003.

"At the functional level, there isn't a rift," he told ComputerWire. "Some companies are interested in some platforms and technologies, and other companies are interested in other platforms and technologies."

Barrett spoke after Liberty co-founder Sun Microsystems Inc was reported to have conceded Liberty's defeat on the Microsoft Corp-dominated Windows platform at the hands of Passport.

Santa Clara, California-based Sun's software chief Jonathan Schwartz is reported to have said "there is no way we" can compete with Microsoft and Passport on Windows. "They have that market tied down really tight."

Schwartz reportedly said he believed a generation of pervasive computing devices such as non-Windows-based smart phones would provide an opportunity for Liberty to come into its own. Sun unable to comment on Schwart'z comments.

Schwartz's comments in eWeek sparked reaction from Liberty members Provo, Utah-based Novell Corp and Waltham, Massachusetts-based Netegrity Inc, who were also quoted with Sun's executive vice president in the same article. Novell, which offers its own operating system, office, directory and authentication products alternatives to Microsoft said: "We don't have to concede anything to Microsoft."

Netegrity pointed to Liberty's cross-platform capabilities, while Passport - as delivered by Microsoft - is limited to Windows.

The recently elected Barrett backed Netegrity, adding that in "relative terms" Passport is used by a small percentage of the internet's users. "Passport has a lot of merchants and customers... but whether it is successful as a standard is another question." Microsoft says there are approximately 200 million Passport accounts.

He insisted Liberty has not officially surrendered to Passport on Windows. "If a company thinks there's going to be an economic case for deploying a Liberty-enabled competitor to Passport, that will occur," he said.

© ComputerWire

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Google opens Inbox – email for people too stupid to use email
Print this article out and give it to someone techy if you get stuck
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.