Feeds

MS touts free security toolkit for SMEs

It's a start, we suppose

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Microsoft today released a security toolkit designed to help Britain's medium-sized businesses evaluate their security needs.

The toolkit, available to order free from Microsoft's UK site, includes resources and tools which deal with both desktop and infrastructure issues.

These include the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer, case studies, white papers, Web casts, product information, evaluation software (Microsoft Windows XP Trial, Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000), security patches, and web links.

This is, of course, primarily a marketing drive (promoting the supposed security improvements in Windows XP) but let's be charitable and say there's information here that will help educate Microsoft's small business customers about security issues.

Mike Pryke-Smith, Medium Business Marketing Manager at Microsoft, said many small businesses are concerned about security but "find it difficult to decide exactly what measures they need to take to improve their security and how extensive those measures need to be".

"The toolkit allows them to easily assess where their requirements are most critical and how to meet those needs quickly and easily," he added

As well as the toolkit, businesses can subscribe to the Microsoft Security Bulletin, which keeps them updated on the latest Microsoft security risks and remedies, the company sagely advises.

That's an important point, given the almost daily stream of security risk alerts emanating from Redmond. This raises the point of whether MS is the organisation best placed to give advice on security issues. As the world's biggest software firm it clearly has some responsibility on this front, and educating small businesses on security issues is a useful first step.

It'd be even more useful if MS made its products secure, of course, but we might be waiting a long, long time for that.

Open source and Unix products do offer an arguable more secure alternative to Microsoft wares, but neither is immune to security issues. A lot depends on product implementation, and firms who're are far sighted enough to think these issues through (whatever platform they use) do us all a favour in making the Internet more secure. ®

Security 'impossible' for Win9x, buy XP now, says MS exec
Proof Win2K is still insecure by design
Of TCPA, Palladium and Werner von Braun

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age
Kiwis to seek random investors for crowd-funded randomiser
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.