Feeds

Adobe moves into document management

And goes direct

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

Adobe Systems Inc will on Monday announce a slew of new products targeting enterprise customers, ComputerWire has learned, and the company will for the first time use a direct sales team to peddle the software,

Jason Stamper writes

.

The new products to be announced are: Forms Server, which renders electronic forms and publishes them to any platform or device; Workflow Server, which enables companies to distribute documents according to business rules; Output Server, for publishing data output from ERP applications according to predefined templates; Document Server, a publishing and document personalization tool; and a new version of its Acrobat Reader.

The new software builds on a product that Adobe garnered through its acquisition of Accelio Corp in April this year, and takes Adobe into competition with content management vendors such as Open Text Corp - which lost the bidding war to acquire Accelio - Documentum Inc and Filenet Corp.

Acrobat Reader 5.1's major new feature is the ability for the sender of an Acrobat document to send a Reader Extension, which enables the receiver of the document to edit it using full Adobe Acrobat functionality. Enterprises will be able to buy a license for 10 Reader Extensions or an unlimited license, though the exact cost of those licenses is yet to be determined.

Adobe said the enterprise customers it is targeting with the new software favor a close working relationship with their software vendors - hence the direct sales force - unlike its more typical graphics professional and consumer customers, which Adobe sells to via the channel. The company will supplement its direct sales efforts for the new, enterprise products with a number of value-added resellers, but conceded that to date it has only a "few" signed up.

In its latest quarter ended September 30, Adobe reported sales of $284.9m, down 2.5% on year-ago figures, and down 10% sequentially. Net income was $47.2m, up 17% on 2001 and down 13% sequentially.

© ComputerWire

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.