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Thieves snatch £4.5m DRAM from Heathrow

Good old, bad old days

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Thieves stole £4.5m worth of computer memory from a warehouse near Heathrow, just hours after it arrived from Korea.

Police are calling on computer dealers to watch out for cheap memory chips. The thieves conducted their "carefully planned" raid in the early hours of Monday, getting away with 290 boxes of memory on four pallets.

Police have arrested a 26 year-old man and released him on bail pending enquiries. If you have any info call Heathrow CID on 020 8897 7412

Detective Chief Inspector Rupert Hollis said:
"The items stolen are a large quantity of computer memory chips and it would be difficult to dispose of this quantity without already having plans in place."

Which shows that he knows a lot more about crime than he does about the DRAM market. In the late 1990s, DRAM ram raids, robberies and theft of PCs for memory were two a penny Considering the prices of DRAM these days, criminals are less bothered, but the value of this haul - fitting snugly into a white van and a blue people carrier - shows that DRAM can still be a worthwhile blag. Also, it's a lot easier to dispose of than banknotes and less risky to sell than drugs. ®

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