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HP ships Itanium workstations running Red Hat

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ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

The new HP Workstation zx2000 and zx6000 Itanium-based workstations can now be configured with Red Hat Linux Advanced Workstation edition in addition to HP's own HP-UX 11i Unix variant,

Timothy Prickett Morgan writes

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These Itanium-based workstations are built on HP's Pluto zx1 chipset and Intel Corp's McKinley generation of 64-bit processors. The entry zx2000 workstation has a single 900MHz McKinley chip with 1.5MB of L3 cache, AGP4X graphics, and up to 4GB of DDR SDRAM main memory, and up to 146GB of disk space all packed into a 4U rack or tower. A base machine with 1GB of main memory, a 40GB disk, an ATI Radeon 7000 graphics card, and an HP-UX license costs $5,865. A zx2000 workstation with the same 1GB of memory and 900MHz McKinley chip plus a 36GB disk and an ATI FireGL4 graphics card, plus HP-UX, costs $8,340.

The midrange zx6000 workstation uses the 900MHz version of the McKinley processor with 1.5MB of L3 cache and has AGP4X graphics as well as support for up to 12GB of main memory. The high-end zx6000 has the faster 1GHz McKinley chip with the 3MB L3 cache memory. Both workstations come in a 2U rack or tower chassis. A dual-processor zx6000 workstation using 900MHz McKinleys and with 2GB of memory, a 36GB disk, an ATI Radeon 7000 graphics card, and an HP-UX license costs $12,205; the same machine equipped with the higher-performing ATI FireGL4 graphics card costs $14,160. By the way, supplies are limited at the moment as this is in back-ordered status at HP.

Between now and October 18, HP is offering two special configurations running Red Hat Linux Advanced Workstation 2.1 for Itanium that it says costs thousands of dollars less than current pricing. Under this promotion, a zx2000 with a 900MHz McKinley, 512MB of main memory, a 36GB disk, a DVD-ROM drive, an Nvidia Quadro2 EX graphics card sells for $3,991. A dual-processor zx6000 with two 900MHz McKinleys, Red Hat Advanced Workstation 2.1, 512 MB of memory, a 36GB disk, a DVD-ROM drive, and a Gigabit Ethernet adapter costs $7,851. The first 100 buyers under this deal get an official Red Hat fedora and a free license to Ericom Software's terminal emulation software suite for Linux.

© ComputerWire

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