Feeds

ADSL for £12.99 – How do they do that?

Freedial smashes through several price barriers

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

What a curious week it's been for broadband. Last week BT boss Ben Verwaayen told journalists that it was highly unlikely that the monster telco would be cutting the wholesale cost of broadband in the near future.

As far as he was concerned, the price of ADSL was about right. Price, he argued, was no longer a major issue when it came to the provision of high-speed Net access.

The antics of this week suggest a different viewpoint, for there's been a flurry of interest concerning an ISP offering 512k ADSL from just £12.99 a month.

Freedial.biz says it can offer the service at well below cost because its strings-attached "budget" service will be subsidised by its "premium" services.

On its website the company writes:

Even selling the Budget DSL plan at "below cost" it more than covers it's cost for at least the initial 12month contract because of the modest surplus from the activation fee and connection equipment thanks to an exceptional deal we have made with the manufacturers.

It's an interesting approach, not least if you can imagine what it must feel like to be a customer of Freedial.biz's "premium" services knowing that you're paying for others to get cheap ADSL.

No one from Freedial.biz was available for comment at the time of writing despite a request for an interview. However, a quick scan of its FAQs yields the following Q&A.

Q. Some people have suggested you may be "fly-by-nights" or a "rip off"?

"We are in this for the long haul and have the finances, resources and background to be able to carry out our commitments to the full. We are determined to provide a service of integrity, stability and efficiency at an affordable price. We do not rely on bank funding, overdrafts, loans and such like and our overheads are very low in comparison to our competitors.

Of course, anyone who was around during the gold rush for unmetered dial-up access would be forgiven if they don't get the slightest touch of déjà vu.

Sheffield-based PlusNet, which operates on extremely tight margins and flogs its ADSL service from £20.99 a month, is sceptical.

Said a spokesman: "It's difficult to see how it can be sustainable. It's difficult to see how it can stay in business."

Other ISPs share PlusNet's concerns. Said one industry insider: "It'll be interesting to see how long it will last." ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?