Feeds

WLAN sales reach for the stars

But too many players

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Website security in corporate America

Wireless LAN sales are rocketing, with shipments expected to grow 73 per cent this year. Even though prices are falling, revenue will grow 26 per cent this year, according to Gartner Dataquest.

The industry will continue this consistent growth in 2003, as worldwide wireless LAN shipments total 26.5 million units, up from 15.5 million units in 2002. Gartner forecasts revenue will hit almost $2.8bn in 2003, up from $2.1bn in 2002, with continued growth expected through to 2007.

Initially the growth in WLANs was driven by the mobile data needs of professional laptop and PC users, but as equipment prices continue to fall and speed increases, wireless solutions will become a viable alternative to
wired LANs in small premises. There's also a growing market for equipment in WLAN hotspots, for telecommuters and more generally in the home.

Gartner forecasts the penetration rate of WLAN into the professional mobile PC installed base will grow from 9 per cent in 2000 to almost 50 per cent by the end of 2003.

Most WLAN cards are currently being purchased as an add-on PC adapter. But in 2002 approximately 10 percent of all mobile PCs will ship with a bundled WLAN card, and it will increase to 31 per cent in 2004.

"Already the top-tier mobile PC manufacturers offer portable PCs with bundled wireless adapters," says Andy Rolfe, principal analyst for Gartner Dataquest's
worldwide telecommunications and networking group.

Intel's intention to incorporate wireless LAN capabilities into the forthcoming Banias mobile platform will spur still more widespread wireless LAN integration in new mobile PCs, he reckons.

By 2007, 68 per cent of mobile PCs shipped will include a wireless LAN capability, according to Gartner.

Because the industry has a great deal of potential, many vendors are trying to enter this market. In 2001, there were more than 70 vendors offering WLAN equipment.

This is far too crowded, so an shakeout is on the cards. The result will see only six or seven significant adapter vendors left by 2005, Gartner Dataquest predicts.

North America is the largest region for WLAN shipments, accounting for 63 per cent of shipments in 2002. But interest in Asia, particularly Japan, and Europe (where regulatory issue are being overcome) means these regions will be increasingly important to sales over the next five years. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley
'People have been brainwashed to believe that their world will be changed forever if they get FTTP'
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.