Feeds

Captain Cyborg is a Media Tart. True

Ten cents a dance...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Professor Kevin Warwick is a media tart, and the kiddie chip that won worldwide publicity last week probably does not exist. These nuggets have been unearthed by Stephen Naysmith, Science Correspondent of the Scottish Sunday Herald, whose report we warmly recommend to Warwick watchers everywhere.

Attempting to secure an interview with Warwick, Naysmith was referred by Reading University to Reading agency INS, which quoted him the rate of £75 for a ten minute interview. INS happily told him: "He's working with us. Everyone involved is signed up with us. A lot of people have been happy to pay." Given that his paper comes from the home of fiscal responsibility and prudence we're pleased that Naysmith declined to cough up, but secured a brief interview anyway.

Although Warwick claims he intends to plant a tracker chip in 11 year old Danielle Duval before the end of the year, he has not asked for ethical approval from Reading University. This would be required prior to any operation. He also told Naysmith that there were "several options" for the technology used by the device, while refusing to confirm or deny that a prototype existed. But if we're still at the options stage, and these options include GPS (according to the Herald interview, they do), then that seems a pretty strong signal that no operational device exists.

Further wackiness about the workings of the system was also added in a piece in the Sunday Times earlier this week, which says it'll need recharging every two weeks and claims, "Hand-held monitors could be used in areas not covered by mobile phones." Coo... how does that work?

Warwick refused to discuss technical details with Naysmith, and justified his refusal to say anything about a prototype by saying, "There are commercial interests involved." Now, we at The Register had been hoping to redeclare our moratorium on Captain Cyborg coverage shortly, and not resume hostilities until the next major atrocity. But we're intrigued by these "commercial interests" - any of them care to put their hand up? ®

Related stories

Kid-chipper Cap Cyborg reported to police, social services
Cap Cyborg to chip 11 year old in wake of UK child killings

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.