Feeds

Nokia launches 3650 Symbian phone

Image Conscious

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Website security in corporate America

Good news today for Symbian from Nokia which today announced the Nokia 3650, a feature-rich handset built with a integrated digital camera, and powered by the operating system.

In essence, The 3650 develops Nokia's imaging phone story beyond the 7650, launched earlier this year in Europe and Asia Pac. The handset is pitched at business and consumer markets. It's tri-band, so works across most of the world for the road warrior, who can access a "wide range of business applications, such as corporate e-mail access, calendar, to-do lists and contact applications". And there's Bluetooth support.

And for the early adopting consumers? The Nokia 3650 is an "imaging handset in Nokia's high-volume "Expression" category, designed to appeal to a mass-market audience of those who are free-spirited, expressive and young-at-heart". Mass market is why it's good news for Symbian (and by extension Psion, which this week said it needs to see 15-20m Symbian handset sales a year, before it makes a profit from its share in the business).

Nokia's free spirits can use the phone to send mobile games, multimedia messaging (MMS) and video clips (the phone has software for playback and recording).

According to the firm,the handset "clearly marks the beginning of a new era for the Series 60", the firm's software reference design platform which sits on top of the Symbian OS and which competes against Stinger, Microsoft's smartphone platform. Samsung, Siemens and Matsushita are Series 60 licensees.

The 3650 launches in early 2003. Nokia today also launched the 3510i, a colour phone for the youth market.

You can see what the 3650 looks like here.

And you can get the rest of the spec here.

And you can read why some early adopters of the 7650 are feeling a little short-changed here. (Basic gripe, the 3650 is a better, almost certainly cheaper phone. They want an upgrade path.)

Related stories

Nokia confirms Samsung phone GUI win
Nokia 7650 - the camera phone future?
Smartphone roadmaps for 2002

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.