Feeds

EFF pimps X-Box cracker ‘victory’

Not getting enough attention lately

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

"The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is pleased to announce that former MIT doctoral student Andrew 'Bunnie' Huang will present a paper explaining a security flaw in the Microsoft Xbox (TM) videogame system," a recent press release begins.

Of course the paper has been available from Huang's account at MIT since April, so any danger from his appearance at a conference is largely imaginary. Huang long ago notified MS of his paper with EFF supervision, presumably appealing to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) exclusion for cryprographic research.

MS replied that while it would prefer that Huang not publish his findings, it had no intention of trying to jam him up with the DMCA. If there were an issue here worth reporting, it would have come up some time ago.

This is pure recycled news. Huang's talk is simply an occassion for the EFF to get some publicity mileage for its selfless struggle to liberate us all.

We recall the last non-issue which EFF inflated into gargantuan proportions as Princeton University Computer Science Professor Edward Felten -- who credited himself and his team with cracking the Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI) Public Challenge -- claimed his 'speech was being chilled' by a vague nastygram from the Recording Industry Ass. of America (RIAA) which cited potential DMCA complications if he delivered his findings in public.

After coaching Felten to voluntarily withdraw from a talk in which he was scheduled to spill the beans, the EFF trumpeted this as an example of protected speech being chilled by DMCA threats. Once he'd enacted that choreographed media stunt, Felten later gave his talk at a different conference and survived without a scratch.

EFF has apparently taught Huang to parrot its victim rap verbatim, as the gentleman is quoted in an organization press release fretting conspicuously that, "the DMCA clearly had a chilling effect on my work. I was afraid to submit my research for peer review until after the EFF's efforts to clear potential legal restraints."

Another close call with catastrophe narrowly averted by EFF vigilance, we're sure. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
Microsoft: Windows version you probably haven't upgraded to yet is ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of Windows 8.1 will no longer support patches
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.