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Cash'n'Carrion sinks claws into Nigerian 419 scam

You read the email, you sent the cash, now wear the shirt

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The Summer apparel offensive continues at our Cash'n'Carrion Reg shop with the release of two exciting new products.

Nigerian 419 and O'Really Practical Unix Terrorism

If you're tired of receiving unsolicited emails from Nigerian 419 scammers posing as the widows of high-ranking army officers with access to cash beyond the wildest dreams of avarice, look no further than our

magnificently appointed t-shirt

.



This limited edition will doubtless provide some consolation to those who have lost their entire life savings in an advance fee fraud. Still, you've got to laugh, haven't you?

Apart from the slogan and "419" logo shown above, the shirt has the full and unexpurgated text of a genuine email from one Dr Adinna Yusuf of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation printed on the back. It's an entertaining read, to be sure.

And there's more. We've expanded the popular O'Really range to include the much-demanded Practical Unix Terrorism. In response to reader requests, this shirt is available in XL and Medium, as are the other O'Really offerings - Snooping Email for Fun and Profit and Distributing Clue to Users.

So there you have it. Get 'em while they're hot. ®

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.