Feeds

Captain Cyborg takes the pee on Radio 5 Live

Mystery of why BT landlines play up in summer solved

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Captain Cyborg, aka Kevin Warwick, has being talking urine during his latest promotional outing.

By this we're not referring to the contents of his latest tome, I Cyborg, but hitherto little publicised details of his early career.

The subject of urine came out when our favourite self-promoting robotics expert told listeners of BBC Radio 5 Live about his early career as a technician with BT (or the GPO as it was known as at the time).

Telephone cables sometimes played up at times of drought, Kevin told us, the solution to which was to water them with a can, or something else. (Yes, we know this goes against everything your science teacher told you about water and electricity not mixing but stay with us here).

On one occasion, the young Kevin was called out on a job when his colleague was caught short.

The young lad decided to relieve himself in the ground and when the pair visited the customer's premises they were cheerfully told that the phones had now started working again.

Amazing.

In 1985, as a trainee engineer with Cable & Wireless, I went out on a few shifts with cable crews in Bahrain. We never once had to water our phone cables, and no-one mentioned the practice to me - which makes me think Kevin is, in every sense, taking the piss.

But I digress.

After relating details of his latest experiment, which involved the implantation of a chip in his arm, Kevin held forth on his usual themes of cyborgs supplanting humanity before fielding a few questions from listeners.

He took calls from people with genuine medical problems, such as Multiple Sclerosis, querying whether Kevin's technology could be applied to help alleviate their condition.

Thankfully, Kev didn't dispense any medical advice. Instead he preferred to focus on the exciting possibilities his research purportly opens up.

Kevin, who came on the show with his largely silent wife Irena, was quizzed about whether his latest experiment was the culmination of his scientific endeavours.

Sadly not.

Kevin reckons that by placing an implant in a person's brain, thought communication might be possible within 10-15 years.

We're convinced. What we really want to know is what does Kevin think of trepanning? ®

Related Stories

Don't know what the fuss is about? Here are two classics from Kieren McCarthy to get you up to speed:
Home truths: Bionic man takes the Metal Mickey
Kevin Warwick: a life in pictures
Finally, here's a link to The Register's extensive coverage of Captain Cyborg.

External Links

A rejoined to Kev's more fanciful flights of fancy (article by Dave Green, co-editor of ntk.net, published by the BBC)
Kevin Warwick Watch

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
Google's whois results say it's a lousy smut searcher
Run whois google.com or whois microsoft.com. We dare you, you PIG◙◙◙◙ER
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.