Feeds

Carry on Shopping: Chipzilla to appeal Xircom ban

Please proceed to checkout

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Intel subsidiary Xircom says it will appeal a ruling preventing it from selling 26 products in the United States.

Intel acquired the lawsuit in 2001. 3Com claimed that Xircom infringed this patent, and since Thursday's ruling, can't stop crowing about its victory. "very well reasoned and comprehensive," it smarmed, and helpfully made the ruling available here [PDF, 1.7 MB]. Xircom unsuccessfully argued that an earlier IBM PC card established prior art. (Most, but not enough of the IBM design was accepted).

The ban applies to RealPort and RealPort2 PC card modems. There's no word of the ban on Intel's shopping page, which merely says the items are "out of stock" and to wait 1-2 weeks for delivery, and invites you to proceed to check out.

When Intel bought Xircom it was licking 3Com fair and square, we noted at the time. ®

Related Stories

Intel to pay $748m cash for Xircom
3Com ends patent talks with Xircom
3Com sues Xircom in modem patent clash

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?