Feeds

Unisys takes high and middle roads with new ES7000s

Twin product streams

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

Enterprise server maker Unisys Corp will today unveil that it has broken the ES7000 server line into two separate product streams so it can better target midrange and enterprise customers who have different scalability and pricing needs.

Unisys, which was the only major server vendor offering servers based on processors from Intel Corp that scaled up to 16 or 32 processors, is starting to see competition from IBM Corp with its four-way xSeries 360 and 8-way xSeries 440 servers, which will soon scale to up to 16 processors. These IBM machines, which all employ the "Summit" EXA chipset, are designed to compete against the entry ES7000 servers from Unisys, and IBM even took potshots at Unisys in the Summit launch to prove that this is one of the real marketing targets of the Summit machines.

Unisys is probably also concerned with any vendor - such as Hewlett Packard Co, Dell Computer Corp, Bull, Fujitsu Siemens Computers, or NEC Corp - that has plans to roll out big midrange and entry Wintel and Lintel servers that will not only compete against Unix servers in the same power class, but also the ES7000s. You might think that Unisys would be particularly concerned about Intel's plans to foster big midrange and small enterprise servers using its E8870 (formerly known as the i870) among its competition, which is a reasonable thing to surmise. And this is why Unisys has beaten its competition to the punch by endorsing the E8870 chipset within the ES7000 and spawning a whole new 8-way and 16-way product line that can be upgraded into the full blown ES7000 servers, which can scale up to 32 processors in a single system image and which may eventually scale even further.

Unisys is now selling two classes of ES7000s. The "Orion" servers are based on the Unisys Cellular MultiProcessor (CMP) chipset created by Unisys. CMP is a derivative of technologies employed in the company's mainframes, and it allows four-way server boards using Pentium III Xeon, Pentium 4 Xeon, and Itanium processors to be connected together to offer from 8 to 32 processor configurations with a single system image. The CMP architecture also allows for partitions to be created for each server board, or spanning multiple server boards. Unisys supports Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Datacenter Server, and the beta releases of Windows .NET Server on these machines as the host environment or within individual partitions. The company also supports SCO's UnixWare and Caldera International's Open Unix 8 as the host environment or with partitions as well. These environments can be mixed and matched on a single machine.

The first Orion server was announced in mid-March as the ES7000/200, and because of Intel's delays with the Itanium 2 "McKinley" processors and E8870 chipset (we presume), Unisys held off on announcing all of these other machines that debuted yesterday and just went with the Orion machine that used its chipset and the then-new "Foster" Pentium 4 Xeon processors. The ES7000/200 includes 16MB of L4 cache per four-way cell using Pentium III Xeon processors, and 32MB of L4 cache for every four-way cell using Foster or Itanium processors. Main memory in the box scales up to 64GB using 2GB memory blocks, and the server has a sustained memory bandwidth of 20GB/sec. The ES7000/200 supports 96 PCI slots and has an aggregate sustained I/O bandwidth of 5GB/sec. The Orion ES7000/230 is tuned to support only the Xeon MP processors, and supports up to 32 processors, up to two partitions, up to 64GB of main memory, and up to 96 PCI slots. The Orion ES7000/130 is based on the E8870 chipset and supports one or two 16-way servers in a single frame; its base configuration is a single 16-way machine. The Orion servers in a workable configuration, including operating system, main memory, and disk storage, sells for between $140,000 and $700,000, according to Mark Feverston, vice president of enterprise server marketing at Unisys.

The Aries product line targets a lower price point, but it offers less scalability than the Orion line. The Aries ES7000/130 server supports up to 16 McKinley processors, up to 64GB of main memory, and up to 16 I/O slots. The Aries ES7000/230 server supports up to 16 Xeon MP processors, up to 32GB of main memory, and up to 48 I/O slots. Configured Aries machines range in price from $75,000 to $300,000, says Feverston.

Feverston says that the Aries machines are upgradeable to the Orion machines and that customers will not have to do a box swap to move between machines, even though they are based on different chipsets and different architectures. These servers will also support future "Gallatin" Xeon MP and "Madison" Itanium processors when they become available.

He also indicated that Unisys was exploring the option of putting a 32-way Orion using 32-bit Intel chips under the same server skins alongside a dual 16-way IA-64 configuration to create a 64 processor enterprise server that could be administered as a single machine even if it did have three different system images. This capability could come later this year.

© ComputerWire

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Great changes, but sssh don't mention the...
Why HELLO Amazon! You weren't here last time
OpenBSD founder wants to bin buggy OpenSSL library, launches fork
One Heartbleed vuln was too many for Theo de Raadt
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Got Windows 8.1 Update yet? Get ready for YET ANOTHER ONE – rumor
Leaker claims big release due this fall as Microsoft herds us into the CLOUD
Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!
The clock is ticking louder for Windows Server 2003 R2 users
Patch iOS, OS X now: PDFs, JPEGs, URLs, web pages can pwn your kit
Plus: iThings and desktops at risk of NEW SSL attack flaw
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Red Hat to ship RHEL 7 release candidate with a taste of container tech
Grab 'near-final' version of next Enterprise Linux next week
Apple inaugurates free OS X beta program for world+dog
Prerelease software now open to anyone, not just developers – as long as you keep quiet
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.