Feeds

IBM blades cut it for Giga

Which is nice

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

IBM's launch of high-end enterprise blade servers in Q3 has earned the thumbs up from analyst firm Giga.

Giga reckons that IBM's e-server BladeCenter by a "slim margin" to better recent high-end blade server announcements from Dell and what it believes Compaq (HP) will deliver. BladeCenter, like competitive offerings, is designed for mid-range applications or database servers, rather than lower-power edge services.

IBM's server blades "are the highest performance dual-CPU blades announced to date by a major vendor", it reckons. Giga gives IBM's blades the edge because of the presence of redundant Fibre Channel data paths and an embedded FC switch option for the chassis.

Each of IBM's blades will have a pair of 2.2GHz Intel Xeon-DP (Prestoria) processors with support for up to 8GB of memory. They use the same ServerWorks Grand Champion LE chip set found in many standard two-way rack mounted servers. They can be expected to have similar performance.

IBM will pack up to 14 blades in a 7U enclosure, as opposed to six blades in a 3U enclosure, the form factor favoured by Dell. Both set-ups offer 84 blades per 42U rack. Compaq is expected to ship high-end blade servers that give 56 blades per rack.

While this is less dense than Pentium III-based low-power blade servers from the likes of RLX Technologies or Fujitsu Siemens, it is 3.5 times the density offered by Egenera, the only other vendor currently shipping high-end Xeon DP blades.

However, although IBM has said it will ship four-way SMP blades next year, it cannot yet match Egenera capability in that department.

Although IBM is not providing too much information of its blade server plans, Giga reckons its roadmap will fork to provide 64-bit Itanium blades and denser IA32 blades, probably based on Intel's Gallatin processor, which is due to become available early next year. Gellatin processors will offer Xeon performance at substantially lower power consumption.

IBM may also introduce blade servers based on its Power processors, if it senses enough demand from its installed AIX customer base. ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.