Feeds

EU delves further into .NET Passport

'Opening a dialogue'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

European Union (EU) regulators are not satisfied that Microsoft Corp's .NET Passport complies with data protection law.

Regulators have said that while Microsoft has put in place measures to address data protection, elements of .NET Passport require further consideration.

Data protection agencies from 15 countries have stopped short of launching a formal investigation. Instead, further research will be undertaken by a sub-group for presentation to EU members later this year.

EU politicians have voiced concern in recent weeks that .NET Passport violates data protection rights, by gathering and passing on consumers' information.

Microsoft has denied it passes on consumers' information. Furthermore, Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft is one of the few US companies to sign the Safe Harbor framework, to ensure US companies provide "adequate" privacy protection defined by the 1998 Directive on Data Protection.

Regulators need more information before any official hearings can begin, but one official said they are "opening a dialogue".

Jonathan Bamford, assistant commissioner at the UK's Information Commission, said online authentication is a complex area requiring greater attention. "This is worthy of further investigation because it's a complex area," Bamford said yesterday.

Officials will consider a list of "core" data protection issues, Bamford said. These include what information is given to users when personal data is collected, and how affiliated web sites process data in Passport.

Bamford insisted regulators are not "picking" on Microsoft, but said Passport was the most developed system. He added Microsoft's adherence to the Safe Harbor framework was evidence of the company's commitment to data protection principles. "That is a good thing," he said.

Microsoft Europe Middle East and Africa senior attorney for commercial and regulatory affairs Peter Fleischer said in a statement Microsoft is committed to on-going discussions with regulators.

© 2001 ComputerWire.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Bladerunner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it
Go ahead, you're all clear, kid... Sorry, wrong film
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
Forget Hillary, HP's ex CARLY FIORINA 'wants to be next US Prez'
Former CEO has political ambitions again, according to Washington DC sources
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.