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Fujitsu Siemens, Dell win Inland Revenue 30,000 PC gig

Computacenter does the donkey work

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Fujitsu Siemens and Dell have won multi-million pound deals to supply the Inland Revenue with replacement desktop PCs.

The agreements are part of the Inland Revenue's ongoing desktop refreshment programme to replace around 30,000 of its desktops over the next 14 months. Fujitsu Siemens Computers and Dell have been chosen to supply the replacement PCs, with Computacenter, the giant reseller, fulfilling the contract in both cases.

Fujitsu Siemens Computers will supply around 15,000 SCENIC S small form factor desktop PCs, which feature Pentium 4 processors. Each will be loaded with a standard software image to ease administration.

Dell is the nemesis of the channel, unbundling product from services and eating up margins. So why do resellers such as Computacenter help their arch-enemy.

This question is posed by Gary Butters, UK corporate sales director of Fujitsu Siemens. Speaking at the firm's channel conference last week, he called on resellers to 'withdraw your labour' from Dell.

His arguments are reported in Microscope, the UK's best channel newspaper. ®

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