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Ebone to shut as sale falls through

Threat number 192

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KPNQwest's Ebone network could be on the verge of shutting down - again - following the collapse of a deal to purchase the high-speed network.

A UK consortium - Oakley Investors - had been in talks to buy the 25,000km European data network.

But according to insiders the deal fell through last night after the banks demanded that Oakley pay E45 million to keep the Ebone network running for another couple of weeks.

Oakley, it seems, was only prepared to fork out E25 million.

According to an email received by The Register: "At around 20:00 last evening, the last people from the NOC (Network Operations Centre) left the building and today a few people have gotten a contract to shut down the Ebone network."

Of course, this isn't the first time that threats such as this have hovered over the future of KPNQwest. A quick glance through the headlines below shows just how bad it's been.

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