Feeds

HP's Unix Aim is Tru

Mix and match

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

Hewlett Packard Co will deliver the clustering and file systems extensions from Compaq's Tru64 Unix variant to its own HP-UX in 2004. The extensions will be delivered in the second version of HP's Unix operating system designed for both Intel Corp's Itanium 2 platform and HP's own PA-RISC processors.

In something of a rare occurrence with technology acquisitions, the Unix and Alpha processor expertise that Compaq acquired with Digital Equipment Corp in 1998, and was subsequently acquired by HP this year, will live on in HP-UX and Intel's future versions of the Itanium processor family.

Palo Alto, California-based HP currently has two versions of its HP-UX Unix available, HP-UX 11i for its own PA-RISC processors, and the recently announced HP-UX 11i v1.6 for Itanium 2. These will be superseded by a single version for both PA-RISC and Itanium with HP-UX 11i v2 in 2003, which will also feature the first phase of HP's self-healing and self-tuning development work and support for scaling up to 128 processors.

The arrival of Tru64's TruCluster clustering capabilities and journaling file system will come in 2004 with HP-UX 11i v3, to be followed by phase two of the self-healing and self-tuning functionality with HP-UX 11i v3 in 2005.

In 2004/2005 HP sees a cross-over between the performance capabilities of its own PA-RISC and Alpha processors and Intel's Itanium 2, and the company believes that this will be the point at which many current Tru64 Unix AlphaServer users consider moving over to HP-UX and Intel. According to HP's VP of the Alpha Systems Division, Rich Marcello, many customers will still wait until around 2007 to make their move however, driven by application availability and business need.

By that stage, Intel should be making the most of the 500 or so chip developers and 100 compiler experts that are moving over to Intel following the June 2001 agreement between Compaq and Intel. Around half the Alpha developers are already at Intel, adding their 64-bit multi-threading, clustering and parallelism expertise to Intel's processor designs.

There are around 700,000 Alpha customers worldwide according to Marcello, with 400,000 on OpenVMS and 300,000 on Tru64 Unix. While the company's stated aim is to keep 100% of those end-users, Marcello states that he would be "extremely dissatisfied if we lost more than 10%." So far, he says, response to HP's roadmap from those customers has been good. "99% of customers are okay with it," he says, "because they can see that it was a technical decision that was made."

Nevertheless, HP will be working hard to keep hold of its small but lucrative Alpha customer base. With users typically in the financial, telco, healthcare, government and high performance computing markets, HP is aiming to keep its Alpha customers happy. Part of that is a ten-year commitment to support existing Alpha customers. A revamp of the AlphaServer line will be delivered in early 2003 with the EV7 'Marvel' processor, to be followed 18 months later with the EV79 speed enhancement. Systems based on the EV79 will continue to be sold through 2006, and will be supported through 2011.

While Tru64 Unix customers will be encouraged to move over to HP-UX 11i v2 from 2004 onwards, OpenVMS will itself be ported to the Itanium processor. In order to assist with migration, the company has introduced the AlphaServer Customer Assurance Program, which offers a money-back satisfaction guarantee for transitions to Intel systems, as well as training, leasing and architecture programs. The company is also offering cross compilers, API extensions and systems management tools to ease the migration of in-house developed applications.

As for commercial applications, HP says that it is seeking assurances from its Tru64 Unix and OpenVMS ISVs that Intel versions of existing applications will be available to ease the transition path. Again, Macello says the reaction has been good. "The cost of losing a customer is high," he explains. "Also, HP is going to be the number one supplier, and they don't want to put us off."

© ComputerWire

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead
Bring your own disks to its object appliances
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.