Feeds

It's bloody hard to host a newsgroup (in Norway)

Tele 2 fined for child porn

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The district court of Oslo has ruled that Scandinavian ISP and telco Tele2 is legally liable for distributing pictures containing child porn and other indecent images in its newsgroups.

Tele2 was fined a hefty NOK 500,000 ($63,500) by the Norwegian court, reported Scandinavian Web site Digi.no.

Markus Takte, Tele2's CEO in Norway, says the company will appeal this 'absurd' ruling. He claims that he is merely a distributor of the content and not publisher - and therefore cannot carry the same responsibilities as a publisher.

However, the ruling appears to have caused at least one ISP to think again. Telenor - one of Tele2's competitors - immediately shut down all its newsgroups that it thought may have contained indecent pictures.

The Norwegian authority Okokrim - a law enforcement agency for white collar crimes - is reported as saying that the move by Telenor was an over-reaction.

However, Okokrim consider the ruling against Tele2 as the right outcome.

The ruling has also caused quite a stir in Sweden, (Tele2 is a Swedish company). The ruling - if not changed upon appeal - may lead to a situation where the ISPs are forced to lessen interactivity in the networks and apply a cable operator business model to
their systems - rather like AOL. Hence, the Internet runs a risk of being split up into small islands with decreased interactivity between the networks. The latter effect is commonly referred to as 'splinternet'.

Mikael Pawlo is a Swedish lawyer who specialises in Internet regulation. His website is here.

Related links

Case report by Digi.no (in Norwegian):
Digi.no on the Telenor shutdown (still Norweigan
Digi.no on Okokrim's reaction to the shutdown (You guessed it)

Splinternet theory
It's bloody hard to run a forum (in Sweden)

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.