Feeds

Java applets for the masses

Kill all the programmers

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The next step in data security

A new software tool which enables programming virgins to build their own Java apps and applets makes its debut at Internet World tomorrow. And it's cheap - £99. or £40 if you’re a student.

Called Imitate, the software is designed to bring Java applets to the masses. Its maker claims that a user new to Imitate can build from scratch an animated slogan, which bounces across a computer window. Quizzes and polls are two other obvious applications.

"More significantly however, is that it will allow people with perhaps very limited programming skills to add functionality to a web site or intranet that would previously have needed an expensive programmer to develop."

Imitate is the brainchild of Dr. Edmund Furse, a leading British academic in the field of artificial intelligence.

He has developed a way of replicating human imitation learning through a computer model, which is incorporated into Imitate. The upshot is that users work through the steps of the function they want to build “and the software automatically writes a Java programme that is a generalisation of those actions”. This differs from a macro, which has no intelligence and is unable to generalize an example, Furse points out.

The software is supplied with a series of instructional movies in which Furse shows how to carry out various procedures including: designing layouts; giving buttons actions; using the learn table; web clipping and creating a graph from a series of statistics.

It runs on several software platforms including Apple Mac OS9, Microsoft Windows 98, NT and XP. System requirements are 64MB of memory and 150MB of disk space (more if videos and sample files are included.

Furse has set up a company called Imitation to develop and sell the software. So far, there are eight employees.

The next step we guess is a review. We'll sort one out in a week or so. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.