Feeds

IBM beats up on Dell servers

Price and Performance

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

IBM today announces a new dualie Intel Xeon server and it's positioning it head-to-head against Dell.

The x235 two way Xeon DP server targets what it says is "the sweet spot of Dell’s server lineup", coming in at up to $1,000 cheaper – 20 per cent less - than a similarly specced Dell Poweredge 4600. Oh and it beats up on the Dell model when it comes to benchmarks – or on Microsoft Exchange 2000 Messaging throughput, at any rate. This is 11 per cent faster on the x235 than the PE 4600, IBM helpfully points out.

As to price, IBM compares a Dell PE 4600 configured with one 2.2GHz Xeon processor 512MB DDR, HS redundant Power, and one 18GB 10K hard drive, with the same spec X235. The Dell comes in at $4746 (as of June 10), while the IMB comes in at $3724. Of course, IBM is not shipping the X235 until late June, so Dell has some time to adjust prices.

"The x235 beats Dell's system on price, it beats them on performance and delivers significant value derived from cutting-edge technology," said Jim Gargan, vice president, IBM eServer xSeries.

It's interesting that IBM is gunning for Dell, rather than HP, the market leader in Intel server sales. It’s even more interesting that IBM is choosing to fight on price (OK price/performance), always a risky option with Dell.

Perhaps Dell, No.2, is picking away at server customers which IBM would traditionally think of as its own. IBM is the market leader for server sales overall by value, but not by volume. That's where the 2-way Intel server segment sits – it's worth an estimated $10bn in annual sales, according to IDC, so it’s worth fighting for.

IBM’s X235 server is housed in a tower unit and is targeted at “price-conscious” medium-sized businesses. The company names traditional file and print and messaging as two appropriate applications for the box.

The spec includes integrated dual Ultra320SCSI controller, complete with a PCI interface incorporated onto the chip, enabling data transfer of up to 320 MB a second. Two Active PCI-X slots are supplied.

IBM today also announced the X255, a 4-way box based on the new Xeon MP processor. This supports up to 800GB of internal storage, and support for Ultra 320 and U320 hard drives.

It's also the first xSeries server, incorporating Hot Spare Memory Protection, a self-managing feature designed to provide automatic protection from memory failure. The X255 also does well with the MS Exchange throughput benchmark and it also launches late June. There’s no price yet. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.