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Panrix goes titsup – again

Liquidation this time

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Panrix, has gone bust again. But this time, there's no escape hatch. The Leeds system builder has gone into Creditors' Voluntary Liquidation, calling on accountancy firm Wilson Pitts to wind up the company's affairs.

Liquidator Philip Deyes who was appointed yesterday said it was too soon to estimate liabilities, creditors' dividends etc. or to supply a reason for Panrix Technologies' collapse.

This information should be ready on June 18, when a creditors' meeting is called, he said.

Panrix went bust for the first time in May 2001. The owner Gulberg Panesar made an offer for the assets of the company and set up again as Panrix Technologies.

Panrix is believed to have been struggling from lack of business, if the fire sale prices on ads in last month's PC Pro is anything to go by.

Meanwhile, the future of the rather more prominent Dan Technology is still up in the air. The company last Friday was locked in talks with BDO Stoy Hayward, but no administrators have been appointed at time of writing. ®

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