Feeds

UK plc reamed online

Security breaches double over last two years

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A lack of investment in security systems is allowing British companies to fall victim to increasing severe security breaches.

That's the main finding of the Department of Trade and Industry's (DTI) annual Information Security Breaches Survey, which concludes that the average cost of a security breach is £30,000, with several companies reporting incidents which cost more than £500,000.

The survey, led by PricewaterhouseCoopers on behalf of the DTI, shows that three-quarters of UK businesses believe that they hold sensitive or critical information, but only one-quarter have a security policy in place to protect it.

Senior managers identify security as a high priority but there's a marked difference between this, and actually doing something about it.

This lack of attention to security is cited as the main reason that the number of UK businesses that have suffered a malicious security incident since 2000 has almost doubled. Half of companies (four out of five large businesses) fell victim over the past year to viruses, hacking attacks, fraud, and other information security breaches compared to one quarter in 2000 and less than one in five in 1998.

The survey, which it has to be pointed out was conducted in association with security vendors, suggests UK businesses are not spending anywhere near enough to protect the business that they are doing online. Less than one quarter of those quizzed spend more than one per cent of their IT budget on security, against a "minimum reasonable level" of three to five per cent.

The findings come from a survey, conducted between October 2001 and January 2002, which involved 1,000 telephone interviews; 100 face to face interviews; and answers to an online questionnaire.

Full results of the survey will be made available during the Infosecurity Europe 2002 conference on 23 April. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.