Feeds

Text messaging poised for rollout via DECT, land lines

Telcos look to wireless money spinners for revenue

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Text messaging, a huge success for the mobile phone business, is now poised for take-off via fixed lines as well, with some intriguing implications. Eatoni Ergonomics, which produces the Letterwise predictive text entry software for handheld devices, says it has struck licensing deals with Siemens, Philips and Panasonic, who will be using the software on their next generation of SMS cordless phones in Europe, and that this gives it over half of the SMS DECT market.

Not that this is currently a large market, but it has prospects. DECT (the Digital Enhanced Cordless Telephony standard) SMS (Short Message Service) systems are already available in Italy and Germany, but widespread rollout has been slowed by the lack of a single standard. This is now in place (ETSI's Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT), Low Rate Messaging Service (LRMS) including Short Messaging Service (SMS), since you ask) and the carriers are gagging for it.

In order to have SMS on a DECT phone, you need two things - an SMS-capable handset, and a carrier offering SMS services (well, obviously). According to Eatoni technical director Terry Jones, the way it will likely operate is that you'll phone a number given to you by your carrier which will then flag your phone as enabled to receive SMS, and off you go.

The handsets themselves will have to have large enough screens for you to be able to read text messages, and actually will tend to look rather like the current generation of mobile phones. Some, indeed, will be mobile phones as well, but let's not overcomplicate matters right now.

Granted the fixed line phone companies are looking to the mobile companies are looking to the mobile industry for inspiration, why stop at SMS? As ETSI says: "the Low Rate Messaging Service (LRMS), now under approval procedure, provides a means for the slow, acknowledged or unacknowledged, transfer of multimedia message objects, including the Short Message Service (SMS). It provides both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint messaging. This service may be used for private and public roaming applications."

That could cover quite a range of applications, but is only one part of the DECT picture. DECT can for example support roaming (so your home handset could be used in public access DECT networks), and a second version Packet Radio System supporting data speeds of up to 2Mbit/s is in the works. ETSI delightfully describes this as "high-speed data," but although it's no great shakes by 802.11x standards, it might have utility if it creeps into the home along with standard phone handsets, or indeed in "low-cost domestic devices," which is mooted along with quite a bit else here.

Too many standards already? DECT's already missed the boat, and anyway, isn't available in the US? Perhaps - but if the fixed link telcos decide it's a money-spinner, perhaps not. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.