Feeds

MS to intro Windows-only ‘Soft Wi-Fi’ 802.11x system

Connected Home Architecture, Connected to whom?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

At this week's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) in Seattle Microsoft will take the wraps off its big push into home wireless networking and open up on the Microsoft Connected Home Architecture. As a part of this, Microsoft will be introducing what is essentially a proprietary, Windows-only version of 802.11, "Soft Wi-Fi," which looks pretty much like a re-run of the Winmodem scenario.

Microsoft is currently kicking off a beta test of home wireless networking, and it seems probable that this will actually be of Soft Wi-Fi. As with Winmodems, the "soft" part comes from offloading processing from the wireless adapter to the PC itself, thus allowing manufacturers to make cheaper adapters. The happy - from Microsoft's point of view - side-effect of this is that it transforms a standard technology into a semi-proprietary Microsoft-only one, making it difficult for people using non-Microsoft operating systems to use the hardware, whereas with Windows it'll work out of the box.

Take a look at the size of the list here to get an idea of the amount of work that goes into getting around this sort of gag.

As yet we only have the session headings to go on, as WinHEC doesn't kick off until tomorrow, but there's more than enough for us to be going on with. The Connected Home Architecture, which seems to be a new umbrella term, is central, and comes with sub-topics such as the Windows Connected Display Architecture (Mira, presumably), Integrated Device Control for Windows, Adaptive AV Streaming and Home Networks and (we're really looking forward to this one) Designing the Home Network Edge.

There's also a comprehensive track on digital media and DRM, and in addition to Soft Wi-Fi, Enabling IEEE 802.11x in the Cellular Environment will be covered. WinHEC teaser list can be found here, more info later in the week, we hope. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
(Not so) Instagram now: Time-shifting Hyperlapse iPhone tool unleashed
Photos app now able to shoot fast-moving videos
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.