Feeds

Weak crypto casts shadow over ecommerce

Short, vulnerable keys

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

US export restrictions and local legislation on cryptography still casts a shadow over the security of ecommerce site even years after regulations to permit the use of strong encryption.

That's according to a survey of SSL servers by Netcraft, carried out last month, which discovered 18 per cent of supposedly secure servers use potentially vulnerable key lengths.

In most European countries more than 25 per cent are still using short keys, and in France, which had laws restricting the use of cryptography until relatively recently, over 40 per cent of sites are using short keys. This compares to under 16 per cent of secure servers in North America which use weak encryption.

Since January 2000, the US has allowed companies to export any encryption product to commercial firms, individuals and other non-government end-users without a license. These regulations include exports to all countries bar exports to Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria, which the US classifies as "terrorist supporting states".

Netcraft reckons export grade cryptography remains quite common outside North America partly because the relative weakness of the server's choice of cryptography is not obvious to sys admins, so there is so little pressure to make the change.

If browser developers include an indication of key length - rather than the present lock symbol displayed on all SSL sessions - this may prompt the necessary upgrades, Netcraft suggests. Admins could act before then, of course, but given how slowly people applied patches to upgrade well known flaws to Microsoft's IIS Web server software perhaps an additional incentive is needed. ®

External Links

Ccrypto law survey

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?