Cyborg strip-searched by Air Canada

Are we allowed to say 'anal probe'?

Canada's answer to Captain Cyborg is suing Air Canada for CAN$1m for hurt feelings, loss of incomes etc, after he was stripsearched and missed his flight.

Professor Steve Mann of the University of Toronto, who describes himself as a cyborg, attempted to board a flight at St. John's, Newfoundland wearing "computerized glasses, headgear and electronic body suit". He was stopped and "subjected to an extensive search". So extensive that he missed his flight, and was unable to get another flight for two days.

Air Canada officials did not believe Mann when he said he needed the gear for medical reasons, and, he alleges, they made him bleed when they removed electrodes from his chest.

So upset was the Prof, whom henceforth we shall call 'The Toronto Terminator', that he checked himself into hospital on return to his home town.

The Toronto Terminator is a specialist in wearable computers and has worn full Cyborg paraphernalia for 20 years. By the look of things, he is now the world's first activist for cyborg rights, with this groundbreaking lawsuit.

The Toronto Terminator has hired a lawyer, Gary Neinstein, who has already filed notice of the lawsuit

"Basically, we are going to argue Professor Mann was discriminated against because he is a cyborg," Neinstein told Canada's National Post.

"You can laugh at that, but I don't see the difference between showing up at the airport in a wearable computer, and showing up in a wheelchair.

"My client is a cyborg, not a terrorist."

Cyborgs have feelings too, OK? ®

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