Taking the piss is banned in South Carolina

Urine the money - move to NC

Taking the piss from online vendors is officially banned in the South Carolina, following a Supreme Court (yes, Supreme Court!) ruling.

In 1999, the state of South Carolina passed a law making the sale of (human, we guess) urine online verboten, to the dismay of local online bladder merchant Kenneth Curtis.

He has sold his urine, through Privacy Protection Services, since 1996. The piss purveyor guarantees the samples, costing $69 a shot, are drug free and throws in a small pouch, tubing and something called a "warming packet" with each sale. Bargain.

Mr. Curtis's customers are of course interested mainly in procuring the piss for fooling at-work-drug tests. So what, Curtis says - he's not responsible for how people take the piss, and besides the tests are often unconstitutional, anyway.

So he took the South Carolina piss prohibition - first time offenders can get up to three years jail! - to appeal to the Supreme Court. He fell at the first hurdle - the Supreme Court declined to hear the case.
Curtis has done the sensible thing and moved his business to North Carolina. ®

You wanna know more about warming packets?

Designed to easily be concealed on the body the kits are complete with chemically reactive supplemental heat sources and temperature monitoring system that insures proper acceptance temperature is maintained (Proper temperature is a critical element for acceptance at any testing site). You can use our kit in a natural urinating position, unisex (male or female), and you cannot be detected even if directly observed.

Each kit contains a small reservoir pouch (about the size of a pack of cigarettes) that has a small diameter tube that can be routed to the genital area. The tube has a fitted silent quick release flow/stop clip that makes dispensing easy and natural. The kit can be stored indefinitely or kept at the ready in case of random type testing. These complete kits provide everything you need for (2) urine testing procedures.

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