Feeds

Nokia, Symbian score blockbuster Samsung phone win

Microsoft's biggest phone ally turns turtle

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Exclusive According to our most reliable sources, who have proved very reliable indeed recently, Samsung has signed a deal with Nokia to license the latter's Series 60 user interface for smartphones.

Samsung has been the only significant brand to sign-up for rival Microsoft's SmartPhone platform, and it represents a major breakthrough for Nokia in establishing its credentials as a software licensing company. The Series 60 deal could mark a turning point in the battered fortunes of Symbian, as the UI, formerly known as "Pearl", runs on top of the Symbian OS. The Korean giant's expertise in building CDMA phones gives the anti-Microsoft camp a major boost in the US market.

Symbian endured a calamitous GSM Congress a fortnight ago, coming days after the resignation of its CEO Colly Myers. Interviews were cancelled at the last minute, and no stand-ins were made available.

But the announcement of Ericsson/Sony's P800 imaging smartphone earlier today helps deflate the Redmond spin that Symbian is all but a distant outpost of the Nokia empire these days. While it's true that the Finns do call many of the shots, it doesn't follow that the rest of the industry has shunned the platform. Far from it. Sony has its own "Stork" Symbian based smartphone in the pipeline, and is already introducing Sony technology into the P800 successor, "Linnea 2"; and Motorola has based its Paragon smartphone on Symbian too. Panasonic has yet to announce its Symbian 7-based mediaphone.

Smartphones have always been interesting in their own right: they're very personal converged data devices; but politically, they pitch Microsoft's most two powerful antagonists - Nokia and Sony - in opposition, and neither opponent needs to give Redmond any quarter.

A twenty-strong team of Samsung engineers has been working on the smartphone since late last year, we understand.

A spokesman for Symbian in London declined to comment. ®

Related Scoops

Smartphone roadmaps for 2002
Motorola to axe Palm smartphone
Palm confirms Motorola, Nokia smartphones axed
Nokia takes charge at Symbian
Can Club Nokia thwart .NET?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
You! AT&T! The only thing 'unlimited' about you is your CHEEK, growl feds
Man, we did everything but knock on their doors - carrier
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
EE launches 150Mbps '4G+' in the heart of London
LTE-A – Faster phones for Hoxton Hipsters
Watch out, Samsung and Apple: Xiaomi's No 3 in smartphones now
From obscurity to selling 19 million mobes a quarter
Brazil greenlights $200m internet cable to Europe in bid to outfox NSA
Only one problem: it won't make the slightest difference. And they know it
Wanna hop carriers with your iPad's Apple SIM? AVOID AT&T
Unless you want your network-swapping tech disabled for good, that is
Knocking Knox: Samsung DENIES vuln claims, says mysterious blogger is a JOKER
But YES, system does store encryption key on the device
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.