Feeds

Atrocity of 9/11 to save tech sector – Cheney

And face-recognition outfit Visionics hears the call

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

A profitable surveillance state may rise from the ashes of Ground Zero if the Bush Administration has its way. Indeed, high-tech gizmos will play an increasing role in US military ventures and homeland security, Vice President Dick Cheney said Thursday during a speech at the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, California.

According to a report by Reuters, the Veep reckons that a shift in emphasis from useless consumer gadgets to weapons and surveillance gear will help bring back the roaring '90s, when the phrase 'technology firm' was one of the most powerful incantations of the marketplace.

The Bush Administration is attempting to allocate an additional $85 billion in federal revenue for defense budget increases and homeland defense initiatives from which the technology sector can profit, if it would only turn its genius to good.

The Veep explained that another attack against the Fatherland is inevitable, and suggested that the industry has now been called to a higher mission. "The forces that defend you five or ten years down the road will come from the research we are conducting today," the wire service quotes him as saying.

It would seem that the forces that irritate and delay us, and peer into databases looking for nasty titbits about us, will also come from this research. We note that a day later, fingerprint-recognition outfit Identix announced plans to buy face-recognition outfit Visionics for $269 million in stock.

The Register was first to report that Visionics' technology is a dismal failure in crowd-surveillance situations, a market onto which the company nevertheless persists in pushing itself. But as we noted, face-recognition has some value in controlled authentication situations, especially when backed up with a second check such as fingerprint recognition.

So the merger makes some sense, practically speaking, and might indicate that Visionics is looking to do more than make a fast buck off everyone's terrorist fears in the wake of 9/11 by carving out a more modest niche where it can actually deliver on its promises. ®

Related Stories

Face recognition useless for crowd surveillance
Face recognition technology a proven farce

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.