Feeds

AOL UK and Freeserve welcome BT's DSL slash

Big hugs

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

AOL UK and Freeserve could be on the verge of launching mass-market broadband services following today’s announcement by BT that it will slash the cost of wholesale DSL.

The UK’s leading ISPs have both welcomed BT’s announcement although both are still waiting to know the exact details of the telco’s new strategy.

Up until now both AOL UK and Freeserve have been reluctant to promote broadband as a mass market product because they believed the cost of DSL to be too high.

AOL UK chief exec Karen Thomson said: "This is a very positive announcement which we welcome. We are presently examining the details, but it's already clear that this takes us much closer to the dawn of Broadband Britain."

A spokesman for the ISP added that what BT has announced today is "truly very positive" but he reserved final judgement until he had seen the small print.

However, if today’s detail behind the announcement matches the headline figures then AOL UK could offer a mass market DSL service for under £30 a month later this year.

And it points to research that reveals that 85 per cent of its flat-rate narrowband users would like broadband – and 70 per cent of these are prepared to pay a premium for it.

Which suggests that a substantial part of AOL UK’s user base is prepared to make the move to broadband.

Freeserve has also signalled that it is ready to enter the broadband arena claiming that it will become the "number one choice for consumers in broadband".

Said John Pluthero, Freeserve chief exec: "Freeserve has lobbied long and hard for BT to reduce wholesale DSL pricing, and we can now offer broadband to consumers at a price that will drive high levels of take-up, just as we did when we were the first to provide free Internet access to the mass market.

"Our Dixons Group distribution channels and leading online customer base mean we can deliver broadband to Britain effectively, conveniently and quickly," he said.

Earlier today BT said it would slash the cost of wholesale DSL from £25 to just £14.75 a month in a bid to get a million users online by summer 2003. ®

Related Story

BT slashes wholesale DSL costs

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE accused of silencing customer gripes on social media pages
Hello. HELLO. Can EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE HEAR ME?!
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.