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Beware the bogus domain sellers

Cold-calling antics

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Punters are warned to be on their guard against dodgy domain name sales tactics.

Some unscrupulous sales people are calling up companies and individuals whose domains names are nearing renewal and trying to pester them to renew them on the spot.

Others are being cold-called and told that someone is trying to register their domain name and they should snap it up there and then.

In both cases punters are warned they could lose their domains if they don't cough up there and then.

"Such calls are, frankly, highly suspicious," said Lesley Cowley, deputy MD of Nominet UK the national Registry for all domain names ending .uk.

"If you want a domain name, whether for use now or in the future, shop around to find an ISP who will register and look after it for you at a price you are willing to pay.

"The market is very competitive, with plenty of choice - you don't need to be bounced into accepting an offer made in an unsolicited telephone call," said Cowley.

So there. Don’t say you ain't been warned. ®

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