Feeds

Caldera case expert to review Windows XP source code

It's that man again...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Judge Colleen Kollar-Kottely has followed up her interesting decision that Microsoft should allow Windows source code to be independently reviewed by appointing someone characterised by Microsoft as a professional anti-Microsoft expert witness to review it. Which is possibly even more interesting.

She has however denied the States' request for a court-appointed expert.

Professor Lee Hollaar of Utah University has been around the block a couple of times, and has been allowed to look over Microsoft source before, in connection with the Bristol and Caldera antiturst actions. Microsoft roundly denounced him a while back when he wished to file a friends of court brief. At that point he was, according to Microsoft, poised to breach the confidentiality agreements he had signed in order to review the source code.

That was clearly over the top, but it's incontrovertible that Hollaar has worked for Microsoft's antagonists in the past, and that he has done work for DoJ in connection with the government antitrust case in the past. So when Microsoft said he "has made something of a career of testifying against Microsoft," one is inclined to agree, and think, 'yes, and here he comes again.'

Hollaar's previous experience does mean he has a great deal of appropriate background for the job of looking over Windows source code, but as he signed an NDA to only use that information in connection with the Bristol and Caldera cases, that may be more hindrance than help.

He is also clearly vulnerable to more accusations of partiality from Microsoft; but on the other hand, it's difficult to imagine any kind of expert in this field who's not going to end up being objectionable from Microsoft's point of view. He, and other experts to be retained by the States, will again have to abide by a confidentiality agreement covering XP and XP Embedded source code. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.