Feeds

Caldera case expert to review Windows XP source code

It's that man again...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

Judge Colleen Kollar-Kottely has followed up her interesting decision that Microsoft should allow Windows source code to be independently reviewed by appointing someone characterised by Microsoft as a professional anti-Microsoft expert witness to review it. Which is possibly even more interesting.

She has however denied the States' request for a court-appointed expert.

Professor Lee Hollaar of Utah University has been around the block a couple of times, and has been allowed to look over Microsoft source before, in connection with the Bristol and Caldera antiturst actions. Microsoft roundly denounced him a while back when he wished to file a friends of court brief. At that point he was, according to Microsoft, poised to breach the confidentiality agreements he had signed in order to review the source code.

That was clearly over the top, but it's incontrovertible that Hollaar has worked for Microsoft's antagonists in the past, and that he has done work for DoJ in connection with the government antitrust case in the past. So when Microsoft said he "has made something of a career of testifying against Microsoft," one is inclined to agree, and think, 'yes, and here he comes again.'

Hollaar's previous experience does mean he has a great deal of appropriate background for the job of looking over Windows source code, but as he signed an NDA to only use that information in connection with the Bristol and Caldera cases, that may be more hindrance than help.

He is also clearly vulnerable to more accusations of partiality from Microsoft; but on the other hand, it's difficult to imagine any kind of expert in this field who's not going to end up being objectionable from Microsoft's point of view. He, and other experts to be retained by the States, will again have to abide by a confidentiality agreement covering XP and XP Embedded source code. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.