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Toshiba signs for ARM mobile Java chip

For Java-enabled phones and PDAs

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Toshiba has licensed ARM's ARM926EJ-S core processor, for use in mobile phones and PDAs. The ARM926EJ-S is optimised for mobile products supporting Java; it uses ARM's Jazelle technology, and has a claimed speed advantage of up to eight times in Java execution over a software-based JVM.

Toshiba has been an ARM licensee since 1997, starting with the ARM7TDMI and ARM946E-S cores, which it used in its embedded processor business.

The ARM926EJ-S can run Linux, Palm OS, Windows CE and Symbian OS, and is fully synthesisable, enabling it to be applied to several generations of process technology. It also features selectable size instruction and data caches, and instruction and data tightly-coupled memory interfaces.

"Mobile products are evolving to embrace such functions as image transmission, that requires de facto standard Java technology-based middleware. This license will allow us to easily offer a Java technology-based SoC solution to our customers," said Shigeru Komatsu, general manager of the Telecom and Network Division at Toshiba's Semiconductor Company. "Our licensing of the industry-leading ARM926EJ-S core will enable us to expand our SoC solution business with IP-rich advanced embedded-technologies." ®

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