Feeds

That ‘Microsoft’ RTFM page (and sundry spoofs)

In the Whitehouse

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Updated Our inboxes are filling with links to a rogue "How to RTFM" page posted supposedly on Microsoft's Web site.

For those of you who have never worked in tech support, RTFM means Read The Fscking Manual. If this page for lamers really did appear on Microsoft.com it would be hilarious/disgraceful/career-limiting for the poster etc.

But it's a hoax and as such not very funny. It's not a very clever hoax at that - although we can say that because we already know the trick.

Here is the URL in full: http://www.microsoft.com&item%3Dq209354@hardware.no/nyheter/feb01/Q209354%20-%20HOWTO.htm".

Everything before the @sign is irrelevant. The real URL starts at hardware.no which is - you guessed it - a Norwegian computer news site. And no, before you ask, Hardware.no is not trying to hoax anyone: it saved this as a local page when writing about RTFM a year or so ago.

For this Microsoft RTFM page did the rounds last February, on a site called hwnd.net, which appears now to be moribund. We wrote about it at the time too. By this reckoning, it should resurface again sometime in December.

And thanks to our Opera-loving users who point out that this much-loved web browser supplies a security warning when you click on the above link. It tells you that the site address contains a user name (i.e. the bit before the @sign), tells you what the real server is and asks you if you really want to go to the site.

As one reader comments: "Let's all sit down and count down till Microsoft "borrows" this feature for IE 7.0 or something..."



Now for a big fat Register welcome to

Whitehouse.org

. Post-September 11, we received several emails pointing to this Web site, telling us that the US Government's web site had been hacked. These quickly died down - but lately we're getting the same reports. Simmer down: Whitehouse.org is a spoof - as opposed to a hoax - of the US government site. It makes not so gentle fun of the Bush administration, and sometimes it's very funny.



The "real" Whitehouse site is whitehouse.gov. Do not confuse with Whitehouse.com, a hardcore porn merchant. ®

Related story

Spoofed story pokes fun at Gore
'MS antipiracy' hoax triggers paranoia attacks
McDonalds hit by spitting email hoax

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!
Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'
US court hears of cached browser image - not actual request
Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD
'Officers were unable to determine Chicken's intent'
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty
Sales of traditional brekkie foods soar as hungry folk get their mitts greasy
Nuts to your poncey hipster coffees, I want a TESLA ELECTRO-CAFE
Examining the frothy disconnect in indie cafe culture
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?