Feeds

Security bug hits 1m Sony Vaios

Users urged to patch proprietary software flaw

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

A hacker's backdoor affects an estimated million Vaio notebook computers, manufacturer Sony warns.

The security flaw could let crackers manipulate or delete data on hard disks and is found in proprietary software installed on Vaios sold in Asia, the Middle East and South Africa since May 2001.

Vaio models bought in Europe or America are believed to be immune to the problem, which relates to Manual CyberSupport for Vaio Version 3.0 and Version 3.1 that is pre-installed in some models of Vaio computers and the Recovery CD.

In a statement , Sony said because of the vulnerability "there is a danger that a third party may find a way to by pass the software's security and access the Vaio through a homepage on the Internet or by email without authorization."

Either an "Internet homepage, email containing HTML or a HTML file attached to an Email" containing malicious code might be used to exploit the glitch.

"If the Vaio is attacked in this way, it may result in stored data being over written, erased or copied. In this instance, running regular anti-virus software will not protect the affected models of Vaio", Sony warns.

Sony has provided a software patch on its site and is notifying Japanese customers, where the majority of affected laptops were purchased, by email. A call centre to field calls on the problem and offer affected customers the software fix on a CD, has also been set up.

Sony estimates the software bug will cost it up to $1.49 million to fix. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.